Using tanto como with verbs and nouns to say as much/many ... as (comparatives)

To say you have as much or as many of something as something else in Spanish, we use tanto ... como if the thing we are comparing is a noun, or tanto como if what we are comparing is a verb.

Using tanto ... como with nouns

Mi primo tiene tanto dinero como tu sobrino.
My cousin has as much money as your nephew.

Él tiene tanta paciencia como ella.
He has as much patience as she does.

Tiene tantos gatos como ella.
He has as many cats as she does.

La gallina tiene tantas plumas como el gallo.
The hen has as many feathers as the rooster.

Notice we use tanto, tanta, tantos, or tantas in order to agree in number and gender with the noun that follows.

Using tanto como after a verb

Mis alumnos aprenden tanto como tus alumnos.
My students learn as much as your students.

Rosario bebe tanto como Carmen.
Rosario drinks as much as Carmen.

Las naranjas cuestan tanto como las manzanas.
Oranges cost as much as apples.

Note that tanto como never changes with verbs.
Unlike in English, you don't repeat the verb at the end:
 Él tiene tanta paciencia como ella tiene.
 He has as much patience as she does.

See also:
Using tan ... como = as ... as (comparatives with adjectives and adverbs)

Learn more about these related Spanish grammar topics

Examples and resources

Mis alumnos aprenden tanto como tus alumnos.
My students learn as much as your students.


Tiene tantos gatos como ella.
He has as many cats as she does.


Él tiene tanta paciencia como ella.
He has as much patience as she does.


Las naranjas cuestan tanto como las manzanas.
Oranges cost as much as apples.


Mi primo tiene tanto dinero como tu sobrino.
My cousin has as much money as your nephew.


Rosario bebe tanto como Carmen.
Rosario drinks as much as Carmen.


La gallina tiene tantas plumas como el gallo.
The hen has as many feathers as the rooster.


Q&A Forum 4 questions, 5 answers

NicoleB1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Also I wondered if in this lesson, depending on placement, if they change part of speech and if that could also be noted. Thank you.

Asked 7 months ago
InmaKwiziq team member

Hola Nicole

There are students who, at A2 level, still get a bit confused when a lot of jargon is used in explanations; this is why sometimes we prefer not to use the jargon. But we understand that different students have different ways of learning a language, and knowing all the grammatical details help them to understand better, in many cases too. We always try to find a balance.

Nevertheless, you will always find links in lessons that will take you to more information related to the specific content in the lesson, the group of words they belong to, etc. This will help understanding the grammar involved. 

Thanks for your comments.

Un saludo

Inma

Also I wondered if in this lesson, depending on placement, if they change part of speech and if that could also be noted. Thank you.

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NicoleB1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Looking up"Tanto" I found it has many parts of speech. Which are they here? I believe they are adverbs. (interestingly they can be many, many things!)

Asked 7 months ago
InmaKwiziq team member

Hola Nicole

Do you mean tanto here is an adverb? It is when we are comparing the "action", for example:

"Rosario bebe tanto como Carmen" (Rosario drinks as much as Carmen.)

In this case tanto is invariable.

But tanto is an adjective when we compare "things", for example:

"La gallina tiene tantas plumas como el gallo." (The hen has as many feathers as the rooster.)

As an adjective, here, it needs to agree with the noun (plumas, feminine plural). 

Hope this helps

Saludos

Inma

NicoleB1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Thank you.  I wanted to make sure, because in the lesson it doesn't mention what part of speech these are, if they are adverbs or not, etc. It may seem obvious, but to learners it's fraught with unknowns. It would be nice for parts of speech are mentioned in a lesson such as this.  

I found it interesting how many parts of speech a word can have in Spanish.  So this would be helfpul and appreciated. 

Nicole

Looking up"Tanto" I found it has many parts of speech. Which are they here? I believe they are adverbs. (interestingly they can be many, many things!)

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Kong Yiu LouisA2Kwiziq community member

Your tip is: "tanto como after a verb never changes.". But your A 2 is "lleva tantas maletas como ...". So "tanto como" changes to "tanta como".

Asked 8 months ago
InmaKwiziq team member

Hola Kong Yiu Louis,

The unchangeable "tanto como" is referring to "as much as" when we are not comparing "things" but we are saying that someone "does something" as much as someone else. 

So, in this lesson there are two parts:

1. verb + tanto/-a/-os/-as + noun + como    (here tanto changes to agree with the noun)

2. verb + tanto como (here tanto como does not change)

I will add a clarification to the tip so it is clear it refers to number 2 cases. 

Gracias y un saludo

Inma

Your tip is: "tanto como after a verb never changes.". But your A 2 is "lleva tantas maletas como ...". So "tanto como" changes to "tanta como".

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MagsA2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Does the comparative agree only with the noun following it?

Comprad tanta carne como pescado. Should I ignore the gender of the second noun?
Asked 2 years ago
GruffKwiziq team member
test

Does the comparative agree only with the noun following it?

Comprad tanta carne como pescado. Should I ignore the gender of the second noun?

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