Using que to introduce a warning or threat

One way to introduce a warning or threat in Spanish is by starting a sentence with que.

Have a look and listen to the following examples expressing a warning:

¡Que llegas tarde!
You will arrive late!

¡Que no se casan!
They will not get married!

¡Que pierdes tu apuesta!
You will lose your bet!

Have a look and listen to the following examples expressing a threat:

¡Que te robo todo el dinero!
I will steal all your money!

¡Que te agredo!
I will attack you!

¡Que nos comemos todo!
We will eat everything!

Notice how this que does not have a written accent despite being at the beginning of the sentence. It is not a question word, but a conjunction!

Look at the following example to understand how the word que works in this sort of sentence, expressing a warning or threat about something that could happen in the (near) future:

¡Que te dejo solo!  
I'll leave you alone!

We could easily have said the same using a future tense:

¡Te dejaré / Te voy a dejar solo!
I'll leave you / I am going to leave you alone!

Note that the preposition a can go in front of the conjunction que in order to reinforce the warning or threat:

¡A que me voy! 
I really will leave!

See also Conjunción.

Learn more about these related Spanish grammar topics

Examples and resources

¡Que pierdes tu apuesta!
You will lose your bet!


¡Que no se casan!
They will not get married!


¡Que te agredo!
I will attack you!


¡Que llegas tarde!
You will arrive late!


¡Que te robo todo el dinero!
I will steal all your money!


¡Que nos comemos todo!
We will eat everything!


Q&A Forum 2 questions, 2 answers

PatiB1Kwiziq community member

Confusing translation

I'm confused by the translation of ¡Que me ensucias la camisa! (You will get my shirt dirty). Can the following structures be translated similarly (e.g., you will get my shirt dirty).  

¡Que ensucias la camisa mia! o ¡Que ensucias la camisa de mi!

Gracias por todo.

Pati

Asked 1 week ago
InmaKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hola Pati

As a warning, which is what this lesson is explaining, we could also say ¡Que ensucias la camisa mía!, but this is going to be used when you want to distinguish between different shirts and emphasise that the one the person is going to get dirty is YOUR one (not the other one which is somebody else's.)

However, you can't say ¡Que ensucias la camisa de mí! because to talk about possessions "de mí" is not correct. You can say ¡Que ensucias mi camisa! or ¡Que ensucias la camisa mía!

"De mí" is used when expressing "about me", for example:

Están hablando de mí. (They are talking about me)

I hope this clarifies it.

Un saludo

Inma

Confusing translation

I'm confused by the translation of ¡Que me ensucias la camisa! (You will get my shirt dirty). Can the following structures be translated similarly (e.g., you will get my shirt dirty).  

¡Que ensucias la camisa mia! o ¡Que ensucias la camisa de mi!

Gracias por todo.

Pati

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EmanuelB2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

why is there que llegas tarde and not que no llegas tarde? Does the person wanth him/her to come late?

Asked 2 weeks ago
InmaKwiziq team member

Hola Emanuel 

This sentence:

¡Que llegas tarde!

You will arrive late!

It is as if we were saying "I am warning you that you'll be late!

so we need it in affirmative.

You could also say:

¡Que no llegas a tiempo!

You won't get there on time!

(I am warning you that you will NOT get there on time!)

In this case you need the negative because the warning is about "Not getting there on time".

I hope this clarified it.

Saludos

Inma

why is there que llegas tarde and not que no llegas tarde? Does the person wanth him/her to come late?

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