Using para (not por) for a destination

One use of the preposition para (not por) in Spanish is to indicate a destination. Have a look and listen to these examples:

El tren del andén 2 va para Barcelona.
The train on plattform 2 is going to/towards Barcelona.

Vamos para la playa porque hay una fiesta.
We are heading to/towards the beach because there is a party.

Esto está roto así que va para la basura.
This is broken so it's going in the bin.

Note that in this specific use of para, the preposition a is also acceptable.

Have a look:

Necesitamos llevar los paquetes para el almacén.
We need to take the parcels to the store room.

Necesitamos llevar los paquetes al almacén.
We need to take the parcels to the store room.

Learn more about these related Spanish grammar topics

Examples and resources

Vamos para la playa porque hay una fiesta.
We are heading to/towards the beach because there is a party.


El tren del andén 2 va para Barcelona.
The train on plattform 2 is going to/towards Barcelona.


Esto está roto así que va para la basura.
This is broken so it's going in the bin.


Necesitamos llevar los paquetes al almacén.
We need to take the parcels to the store room.


Necesitamos llevar los paquetes para el almacén.
We need to take the parcels to the store room.


Q&A Forum 3 questions, 4 answers

¿Vas ________ casa de Inés?

Vas a/para casa de Inés

Wouldn't there be "la" before casa?Then if "a" or "para" is correct why don't we get "no banana" if we used "para"? In this case using "a" instead of "para" is more correct?

Asked 5 months ago
InmaKwiziq language super star

Hola Marc

You can use both: Voy para/a casa de Inés or Voy para/a la casa de Inés.

Depending on the region you would use a casa or a la casa, but in general, I can say that there is a subtle difference between using one or the other. If you say "voy a casa de Inés", you normally mean you are going to her house to see her. If you say "voy a la casa de Inés", it doesn't necessarily mean that Inés is there, but you may be going to her house to do something different. 

Hope this helps

Saludos

Inma 

¿Vas ________ casa de Inés?

Vas a/para casa de Inés

Wouldn't there be "la" before casa?Then if "a" or "para" is correct why don't we get "no banana" if we used "para"? In this case using "a" instead of "para" is more correct?

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Can you use a and para interchangeably in the case of destination?

Asked 6 months ago
InmaKwiziq language super starCorrect answer

Yes, for destination we can use both a and para; they are interchangeable. However with verb "llegar" (arrive, at a destination) it wouldn't accept "para", only "a". 

"El tren llegó a tiempo a su destino" (not para)

Saludos 

Inma

 

Can you use a and para interchangeably in the case of destination?

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‘Hasta’ for to a place?

As far as I can see, the text doesn’t discuss ‘hasta’ which is listed as an option in the answers but marks as wrong. My dictionary seems to have some examples where ‘hasta’ is used for movement towards a place. What is the distinction?

Asked 7 months ago
InmaKwiziq language super star

Hola Karen

Preposition "hasta" is indeed used express with movement but the difference between hasta and a/para is that when we say "hasta" we mean "as far as [place]", so, for example:

1. "El tren va a/para Madrid" -> The train is going to Madrid. (in that direction)

2. "El tren va hasta Madrid" -> The train is going up to/as far as Madrid. 

Other sentences for example would be:

"Camina hasta la plaza y tuerce a la izquierda" 

(Walk to the square [as far as the square, do not go on] and turn left.)

"Ayer salí a pasear, llegué hasta el cine, y volví a casa."

(Yesterday I went for a walk, I went up to the cinema, and I came back.)

I hope this helps

Gracias

Inma

Thank you

‘Hasta’ for to a place?

As far as I can see, the text doesn’t discuss ‘hasta’ which is listed as an option in the answers but marks as wrong. My dictionary seems to have some examples where ‘hasta’ is used for movement towards a place. What is the distinction?

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