Using ese, esa, esos, esas, eso for that one, those ones and that (demonstrative pronouns)

In Spanish, to express that, that one or those ones we use the demonstrative pronouns: ese, esaesos, esas and eso.

Like all pronouns they do not accompany a noun. The noun they refer to has been mentioned before, either in the same or a previous sentence.

Have a look and listen to these examples:

En general me gustan los coches, pero ese me encanta.
In general I like cars, but I love that one.

Las faldas en esta tienda son bonitas; ¿Te gusta esa?
They have nice skirts in this shop; do you like that one?

Muchos profesores del colegio son antipáticos, pero esos sonríen mucho.
Lots of teachers from the school are unpleasant, but those ones smile a lot.

Entre las amigas de Julia, esas son íntimas.
Among Julia's friends, those ones are close friends.

The pronouns agree in gender and number with the noun they are refering to, this way:

  Masculine

Feminine

Singular (that one)

ese

esa

Plural (those ones)

esos

esas

When the pronoun is referring to an idea, then we use the neutral pronoun eso, and there is only one form. You could translate it as "that/that thing".

Have a look and listen to the following examples:

Eso me parece una tontería.
That strikes me as being nonsense.

Eso no es una excusa para llegar tarde.
That is not an excuse for being late.

 

See also Using ese, esa, esos, esas to say that/those (demonstrative adjectives) to see how these same forms work when accompanied by nouns.

Learn more about these related Spanish grammar topics

Examples and resources

Eso no es una excusa para llegar tarde.
That is not an excuse for being late.


Muchos profesores del colegio son antipáticos, pero esos sonríen mucho.
Lots of teachers from the school are unpleasant, but those ones smile a lot.


Las faldas en esta tienda son bonitas; ¿Te gusta esa?
They have nice skirts in this shop; do you like that one?


Entre las amigas de Julia, esas son íntimas.
Among Julia's friends, those ones are close friends.


En general me gustan los coches, pero ese me encanta.
In general I like cars, but I love that one.


Eso me parece una tontería.
That strikes me as being nonsense.


Q&A Forum 1 question, 2 answers

Buenas tardes Inma,

My question isn't about demonstrative pronouns but it's in relation to the translation of one of the example sentences describing their usage. 

In the 3rd example sentence which reads, 'Las faldas en esta tienda son bonitas' the English translation given is, 'They have nice skirts in this shop'. I thought that this would translate as, 'The skirts in this shop are nice'. The translation given would be 'Tienen faldas bonitas en esta tienda' in Spanish wouldn't it'? Is it an error here Inma or does it not have to be literal translation?

Gracias

Clara 

Asked 4 months ago
InmaKwiziq language super star

Hola Clara

'The skirts in this shop are nice', as a literal translation is absolutely fine too. We gave this other sentence, 'They have nice skirts in this shop', because it sounded a bit more natural. As long as it doesn't affect the purpose of the lesson, in this case the demonstratives, we will try to give the best English translation, even if it is not literal.

In this case, both are fine.

Gracias por tu pregunta

Un saludo

Inma

Hola Inma,

Muchas gracias por tu respuesta.

Un saludo

Clara

Buenas tardes Inma,

My question isn't about demonstrative pronouns but it's in relation to the translation of one of the example sentences describing their usage. 

In the 3rd example sentence which reads, 'Las faldas en esta tienda son bonitas' the English translation given is, 'They have nice skirts in this shop'. I thought that this would translate as, 'The skirts in this shop are nice'. The translation given would be 'Tienen faldas bonitas en esta tienda' in Spanish wouldn't it'? Is it an error here Inma or does it not have to be literal translation?

Gracias

Clara 

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