Note that this is a Europe focused lesson. Your active focus is Latin America.

In Spanish there is a structure that is used to highlight a quality in something/someone. It is very similar to Using [verb] + tan + [adjective/adverb] + que to say "so... that..." 

This similar structure is used very colloquially:

Ser + de un + [adjective] que...

Here are some examples:

Manuel es de un orgulloso que a veces me irrita.Manuel is so proud/such a proud person that he sometimes annoys me.

La receta de Sandra es de un sabroso que ni te imaginas.Sandra's recipe is so tasty that you wouldn't imagine [how tasty].

Victoria es de un creído que hace que todas la odiemos.Victoria is so vain that it makes us all hate her.

Tu novio es de un aburrido que no sé cómo llevas tanto tiempo con él.Your boyfriend is so boring that I don't know how you've been with him for so long.

It's important to note that the adjective always takes the masculine singular form regardless of the gender of the subject. (e.g. Victoria/creído, receta/sabroso)

This structure highlights a quality and then expresses a consequence:

  1. La receta es de un sabroso (quality highlighted about the recipe)
  2. que ni te imaginas (consequence)
  1. Victoria es de un creído (quality highlighted about Victoria)
  2. que hace que todas la odiemos (consequence)

Bear in mind that sometimes the verb estar is used instead of ser if the quality highlighted expresses a change/result. For example:

 
La tarde está de un caluroso que vamos a tener que poner el ventilador.The afternoon is so hot that we're going to have to switch on the fan.

This structure could also be used without the que clause, generally as an open sentence followed by ellipses "..." as a form of superlative:

Mi marido es de un generoso...My husband is so/really generous...

Mi jefa es de un orgulloso...My boss is so/really proud...

This structure is nearly identical to Using ser de un/una [noun] although the one explained in this lesson is more colloquial and it is more often used to highlight a negative quality. 

 

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Examples and resources

La tarde está de un caluroso que vamos a tener que poner el ventilador.The afternoon is so hot that we're going to have to switch on the fan.
Tu novio es de un aburrido que no sé cómo llevas tanto tiempo con él.Your boyfriend is so boring that I don't know how you've been with him for so long.
Manuel es de un orgulloso que a veces me irrita.Manuel is so proud/such a proud person that he sometimes annoys me.
La receta de Sandra es de un sabroso que ni te imaginas.Sandra's recipe is so tasty that you wouldn't imagine [how tasty].
Mi marido es de un generoso...My husband is so/really generous...
Mi jefa es de un orgulloso...My boss is so/really proud...
Victoria es de un creído que hace que todas la odiemos.Victoria is so vain that it makes us all hate her.
I'll be right with you...