Using prepositions a, para, por, de, en, sin, hacia followed by a pronoun

In Spanish all prepositions can be followed by a pronoun in order to express to me, for me, about you, in him, without us, towards them, etc. Let's look at some examples.

With the preposition a

Los profesores me han dado un certificado a mí.
The teachers have given a certificate to me.

¿A ti te afecta la crisis?
Does the crisis affect you?

Le hemos explicado a ella el problema.
We have explained the problem to her.

Notice how when the preposition "a" is used with a pronoun, it is reinforcing the other indirect pronoun also present in the sentence. For example:

Le dieron un regalo. Le dieron un regalo a ella.
They gave her a present. They gave her a present (to her).

With the prepositions por and para 

Antonio lo ha hecho por mí.
Antonio has done it for me.

Para ti es muy fácil todo.
For you everything is easy.

Ellos se preocupan mucho por nosotros.
They worry a lot about us.

Para vosotras todo esto es una broma.
For you [plural] all this is a joke.

 With the preposition de

Las chicas están hablando de mí.
The girls are talking about me.

Gracias, hemos aprendido mucho de ti.
Thank you, we've learnt a lot from you.

Es un honor, viniendo de usted.
It is an honour, coming from you [formal].

 With the preposition en 

¿Tú crees en mí?
Do you believe in me?

Confiamos en ti para el éxito del proyecto.
We have confidence in you for the sucess of the project.

Tenemos dos hijos y nos concentramos mucho en ellos.
We have two sons and we focus a lot on them.

 With the preposition sin

¡Fuisteis a la fiesta sin mí!
You went to the party without me!

No sé qué hacer sin ti.
I don't know what to do without you.

Sin ellas no podemos continuar la clase.
Without them we cannot continue with the class.

 With the preposition hacia 

Hay un gato negro que camina hacia mí.
There is a black cat that is walking towards me.

El viento fuerte sopla hacia ti y es difícil caminar.
The strong wind is blowing towards you and it is difficult to walk.

El policía fue hacia él y lo arrestó.
The policeman went towards him and arrested him.

 

Notice how the first two pronouns (me, you) are: mí, ti. The rest of the forms are the same as the subject pronouns (él, ella, usted, nosotros, nosotras, vosotros, vosotras, ellos, ellas, ustedes).

Also remember: has a written accent [´] while ti does not.

See also Using preposition con followed by a pronoun to say with me, you, him, her, us, you (plural), them.

Learn more about these related Spanish grammar topics

Examples and resources

¿A ti te afecta la crisis?
Does the crisis affect you?


Antonio lo ha hecho por mí.
Antonio has done it for me.


¡Fuisteis a la fiesta sin mí!
You went to the party without me!


Para ti es muy fácil todo.
For you everything is easy.


Gracias, hemos aprendido mucho de ti.
Thank you, we've learnt a lot from you.


El policía fue hacia él y lo arrestó.
The policeman went towards him and arrested him.


Le hemos explicado a ella el problema.
We have explained the problem to her.


Tenemos dos hijos y nos concentramos mucho en ellos.
We have two sons and we focus a lot on them.


Las chicas están hablando de mí.
The girls are talking about me.


Hay un gato negro que camina hacia mí.
There is a black cat that is walking towards me.


Los profesores me han dado un certificado a mí.
The teachers have given a certificate to me.


Confiamos en ti para el éxito del proyecto.
We have confidence in you for the sucess of the project.


Para vosotras todo esto es una broma.
For you [plural] all this is a joke.


Sin ellas no podemos continuar la clase.
Without them we cannot continue with the class.


¿Tú crees en mí?
Do you believe in me?


Ellos se preocupan mucho por nosotros.
They worry a lot about us.


No sé qué hacer sin ti.
I don't know what to do without you.


Es un honor, viniendo de usted.
It is an honour, coming from you [formal].


El viento fuerte sopla hacia ti y es difícil caminar.
The strong wind is blowing towards you and it is difficult to walk.


Q&A Forum 6 questions, 8 answers

LisaB1Kwiziq community member

Por vs Para

Two of the examples shown for por are still confusing for me (por mí, jaja). Both translate to "for + pronoun", but I am having a hard time knowing the difference here. It seems subtle.

Antonio lo ha hecho por mí.
Antonio has done it for me.

Para ti es muy fácil todo.
For you everything is easy.

Asked 1 month ago
InmaKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hola Lisa

Yes, por and para are generally confusing...

1. Antonio lo ha hecho por mí.

Here it means that he's done it "on my behalf" (because I couldn't do it) or "because of me" (I am the reason he did it)

2. Para ti es muy fácil todo.

This is trickier to explain but this "para ti" means either "in your opinion" or "for you" in the sense of "to your ability". Other sentences using this same meaning would be for example:

Para mi hijo, las matemáticas no son nada difíciles.(In my son's opinion/For my son's ability, Maths are not difficult at all.)

I hope this helps

Saludos

Inma

Para ella todos los hombres son iguales. (In her opinion all men are the same.)

Por vs Para

Two of the examples shown for por are still confusing for me (por mí, jaja). Both translate to "for + pronoun", but I am having a hard time knowing the difference here. It seems subtle.

Antonio lo ha hecho por mí.
Antonio has done it for me.

Para ti es muy fácil todo.
For you everything is easy.

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NicoleB1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Re: Reply to Pati's question

Hello

I searched to find the reply but was not successful.  Could you let me know the reply to her question. Thank you. Nicole

This is Pati's question below:

"I'm unsure when (and when not) to use a + pronouns when also using an indirect object pronoun. I understand emphasis, but not real clear when to place emphasis. When I use it normally, it seems redundant. "

Asked 1 month ago
InmaKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hola Nicole

I think Pati's answer had no response because it was in the wrong thread.

But answering now to that question, here is a lesson that deals with the repetition of pronouns. Have a look here.

Saludos

Inma

Re: Reply to Pati's question

Hello

I searched to find the reply but was not successful.  Could you let me know the reply to her question. Thank you. Nicole

This is Pati's question below:

"I'm unsure when (and when not) to use a + pronouns when also using an indirect object pronoun. I understand emphasis, but not real clear when to place emphasis. When I use it normally, it seems redundant. "

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NicoleB1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Small error

Hello,

The word "dificil" in "El viento fuerte sopla hacia ti y es dificil caminar."

should have an accent: difícil? 

Asked 4 months ago
InmaKwiziq team member

Indeed! 

Gracias Nicole. Typo fixed.

Inma

NicoleB1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

De nada Inma.

Small error

Hello,

The word "dificil" in "El viento fuerte sopla hacia ti y es dificil caminar."

should have an accent: difícil? 

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JohanC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Thank you for the answer. Please advise when the table is added.

Le dieron un regalo. Le dieron un regalo a ella.

In your example and in Spanish grammar is the “a ella” repetition of the indirect object “le” essential or is it an optional extention added for the sake of clarity?

Asked 7 months ago
InmaKwiziq team member

Hi Johan

With reference to that sentence "Le dieron un regalo a ella", here is a lesson explaining the repetition of indirect object pronouns. Hope it helps:

Repetition of indirect object pronouns with verbs (general)

Un saludo

Inma

Thank you for the answer. Please advise when the table is added.

Le dieron un regalo. Le dieron un regalo a ella.

In your example and in Spanish grammar is the “a ella” repetition of the indirect object “le” essential or is it an optional extention added for the sake of clarity?

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JohanC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Please help me. In the lesson it says the preposition CAN be followed by a pronoun. it does not indicate what type of pronoun.

The professor gives the certificate TO ME, looks like a indirect object pronoun ie me te le nos os les. Yet the lesson uses mi an adjectival pronoun??   In the test the answer requires Ella a subject pronoun as do some of the examples. 

Asked 7 months ago
InmaKwiziq team member

Hola Johan

In the lesson, after giving examples with each of the prepositions involved, you can read this in a special note:

"Notice how the first two pronouns (me, you) are: mí, ti. The rest of the forms are the same as the subject pronouns (él, ella, usted, nosotros, nosotras, vosotros, vosotras, ellos, ellas, ustedes)."

But to make it clearer we will add a table to the lesson.

Hope this helps.

Saludos

Inma

Please help me. In the lesson it says the preposition CAN be followed by a pronoun. it does not indicate what type of pronoun.

The professor gives the certificate TO ME, looks like a indirect object pronoun ie me te le nos os les. Yet the lesson uses mi an adjectival pronoun??   In the test the answer requires Ella a subject pronoun as do some of the examples. 

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JennyA0Kwiziq community member

when I take a test it would be more memorable to me if I could see my mistake while I view the lesson

Asked 8 months ago
ShuiKwiziq team member

Hola Jenny

I've passed on your feedback - in the meanwhile I know it's not perfect but you can always open the "Explain This" content in a new tab (right click > open in new tab).

Saludos

Shui

PatiB1Kwiziq community member

I'm unsure when (and when not) to use a + pronouns when also using an indirect object pronoun. I understand emphasis, but not real clear when to place emphasis. When I use it normally, it seems redundant.

Le dieron un regalo.   -- vs. Le dieron un regalo a ella.

Somehow I ALWAYS want to use the latter. Is it ever wrong not to use the latter?

when I take a test it would be more memorable to me if I could see my mistake while I view the lesson

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