Conjugate irregular verb saber in El Presente de Subjuntivo

Saber has an irregular stem sep-  in El Presente de  Subjuntivo (but the endings are regular):

yo sepa
sepas
él / ella / Ud. sepa
nosotros/nosotras sepamos
vosotros/vosotras sepáis
ellos / ellas / Uds.   sepan

Look at and listen to these examples:

Ella no desea que yo sepa la verdad.
She doesn't want me to know the truth.

Es mejor que sepas las consecuencias.
It is best that you know the consequences.

Es posible que él sepa que ella ya está casada.
It is possible that he knows that she is already married.

Te llamaremos tan pronto como lo sepamos.
We will call you as soon as we know it.

Quiero que sepáis que sois estupendos.
I want you to know that you are great.

En cuanto ellos sepan las condiciones, nos avisarán.
As soon as they know the conditions, they will let us know.

 

Learn more about these related Spanish grammar topics

Examples and resources

Es mejor que sepas las consecuencias.
It is best that you know the consequences.


Es posible que él sepa que ella ya está casada.
It is possible that he knows that she is already married.


Ella no desea que yo sepa la verdad.
She doesn't want me to know the truth.


Te llamaremos tan pronto como lo sepamos.
We will call you as soon as we know it.


Quiero que sepáis que sois estupendos.
I want you to know that you are great.


En cuanto ellos sepan las condiciones, nos avisarán.
As soon as they know the conditions, they will let us know.


Q&A

allison

Kwiziq community member

9 May 2018

1 reply

Subjunctive clause with same subject?

I thought if the two clauses in a sentence that normally takes the subjunctive both have the same subject, you would use an infinitive form rather than a subjunctive?

Inma

Kwiziq language super star

9 May 2018

9/05/18

Hola Allison

I imagine you are referring to this sentence "No creo que yo sepa nada hasta las diez. (I don't think I will know anything until ten o'clock.)". The need of an infinitive when it is the same subject in both clauses doesn't apply to all cases. That rule generally applies to verbs that express "wish or objectives". For example: "Yo quiero ir a Valencia" (I want =subject I, to go=subject I). In this case it would be incorrect to say "Yo quiero que yo vaya a Valencia".

Plus the presence of "que" will be an indicator to use subjunctive. You can only use the infinitive straight after the verb: "Yo quiero ir" not "Yo quiero que ir".

The sentence that I think you are referring to, mentioned above, doesn't talk about "wish", and the only way to use an infinitive there would be without "que": "No creo saber nada hasta las diez." although it sounds more natural to use the subjunctive with "que" as in the original sentence.

I hope this clarifies your doubts.

Thanks for your query, and if you need more clarification, let us know.

Inma

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