Using todo

TonyB1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Using todo

Yesterday in a store I said to the owner "tiene todo." I was trying to say "you have everything."

He replied (I think) "tengo de todo." I wasn't sure if he was correcting me or not.

Did I get my question right? What was he saying?

Thanks so much, Tony

Asked 1 year ago
JohnB2 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Without knowing the context, I would take it at face value because I have found that the Spanish are direct and say just what they want to say - no frills. You say that you were asking a questions so ...

You have everything? "¿Usted tiene todo?" - when the formal conjugation is used they include the pronoun 'usted."

"Tengo de todo" - [Yes] I have everything. I'm not sure why the "de" would be in there but someone else might comment on that.

Hope that helps.

TonyB1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Hey John, thanks for the response. Sorry, I wasn't asking a question (my mistake in the post) - I was complementing him on the huge range of stuff he had when I said "tiene todo!"

So I'm wondering if "tengo DE todo" is what he said. Is it a correct expression?

Gracias!

InmaKwiziq team member

Hi Tony

There is a difference in context between:

Tiene todo.

and

Tiene de todo.

Imagine you go to that shop with a list of 10 items to buy and you find all you need in the shop; you could say as a comment to the shop assistant: ¡Tiene todo!

This todo here is referring to "everything you had on your list", i.e. a "specific everything". 

Now, imagine you go to a shop (with no list) and after walking around the shop you realise that it is a shop where one can find absolutely everything, a huge variety of different things..., you may say:

¡Tiene de todo! ¡Esta tienda tiene de todo! ¡Usted tiene de todo!

This todo means a "general everything", so whenever you need something you know you can go to that shop you most probably find whatever you are looking for.

I don't think there is any distinction in English for these two sentences. I think in both cases the comment would be the same: You've got everything! or It's got everything!; both meaning either everything I need/I have on my list or just a general everything.

I hope this is clear and clarifies the difference. 

The person was right to correct your sentence, as he/she knew that you were referring to the second case, a "general everything".

Saludos

Inma

Using todo

Yesterday in a store I said to the owner "tiene todo." I was trying to say "you have everything."

He replied (I think) "tengo de todo." I wasn't sure if he was correcting me or not.

Did I get my question right? What was he saying?

Thanks so much, Tony

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