haber in conditional vs imperfect subjuntive

WylieC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

haber in conditional vs imperfect subjuntive

 

 

Hi Inma,

This lesson says that sometimes haber in the imperfect subjunctive can replace haber in the conditional; but doesn't say when. I had a tutor in Mexico who claimed (that least in some cases) the construction had to be hubiera....hubiera; whereas a Mexican friend said the construction is always hubiera.....habría or vice versa depending on which clause comes first. This lesson seems to say you can replace habría with hubiera in this construction if you feel like it. Can you clarify this for me, please?

Asked 9 months ago
InmaKwiziq team member

Hola Wylie

I will modify the text slightly in the lesson to be more precise on this.

Meanwhile I can tell you that you can use hubiera in the conditional sentences of this type:

"Si hubieras venido antes, habrías visto a Juan." (correcto)

"Si hubieras venido antes, hubieras visto a Juan." (correcto)

Also in sentences where the subjunctive is not triggered by any introductory sentence:

"Yo habría hecho lo mismo que tú." (correcto)

"Yo hubiera hecho lo mismo que tú." (correcto)

However habría can not replace hubiera in sentences where the subjunctive is obligatory, for example:

"Me entristeció que mi hija hubiera decidido no venir a visitarnos." (correcto)

"Me entristeció que mi hija habría decidido no venir a visitarnos." (incorrecto)

I hope this helps,

Saludos

Inma

 

"

RC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Following up, you have clarified when the conditional simple may not replace the imperfect subjunctive; are there situations where the imperfect subjunctive may not replace the conditional simple? 

Also, I still never receive email notifications about when new answers are posted. 

Thanks! 

haber in conditional vs imperfect subjuntive

 

 

Hi Inma,

This lesson says that sometimes haber in the imperfect subjunctive can replace haber in the conditional; but doesn't say when. I had a tutor in Mexico who claimed (that least in some cases) the construction had to be hubiera....hubiera; whereas a Mexican friend said the construction is always hubiera.....habría or vice versa depending on which clause comes first. This lesson seems to say you can replace habría with hubiera in this construction if you feel like it. Can you clarify this for me, please?

Sign in to submit your answer

Don't have an account yet? Join today

Ask a question

Find your Spanish level for FREE

Test your Spanish to the CEFR standard

Find your Spanish level
Thinking...