subjunctive vs imperative (command)

PapiB2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

subjunctive vs imperative (command)

I know I have brought this up before, but I think, after seeing this example, I should bring it up again.  Please see the following example:

Cuando comáis esta noche recoged los platos.When you eat tonight, put the dishes away.

From my understanding, the word "recojed" is not subjunctive. It is the vosotros command form used in Spain for plural family and friends (you plural -vosotros form).  The subjunctive would be recojáis (which is both subjunctive and imperative). It appears that "recojed" is only in the  command from, a different tree in grammar.  

I noticed  that others have questioned the use of the imperative.  You hold stedfast that what you are using is the subjunctive, but as learners, we find that there are some differences.  For me, the use of "recojed" would be the imperative.

I have made this distinction in other exercises that use commands as subjunctive.  Maybe I am still missing something, but every verb book/site I reference for the verb trees, makes this distinction.  

In the case of the example above, I don't believe it would change the meaning, However, in some cases when the command has been switched for the subjunctive, the meaning feels different to me.  

Thank you for your consideration!

Asked 1 year ago
InmaKwiziq team member

Hola Papi

In this example you are referring to:

 Cuando comáis esta noche recoged los platos.

(When you eat tonight, put the dishes away.)

"recoged" is indeed the imperative form of vosotros, it is not a subjunctive form. In this lesson we are talking about "cuando" being folllowed by either the subjunctive or the indicative. With this sentence we are indicating a case where cuando is followed by the subjunctive: "comáis" (not recoged). Recoged is part of the main clause "Recoged los platos/cuando comáis esta noche".

I think we are thinking differently to what we understand by 1. a command 2. the imperative 3. the present subjunctive. 

Both the imperative and the present subjunctive can be used to express a command in Spanish. We don't use the word command to indicate a specific tense. There are actually other forms to express a command in Spanish, including the infinitive. 

There is a place in Kwiziq dedicated to explain these concepts. This will clarify it for you.

Have a look:

https://progress.lawlessspanish.com/revision/glossary/sentence-types/dar-ordenes-hacer-peticiones

https://progress.lawlessspanish.com/revision/glossary/sentence-types/dar-ordenes-hacer-peticiones

Saludos

Inma

 

subjunctive vs imperative (command)

I know I have brought this up before, but I think, after seeing this example, I should bring it up again.  Please see the following example:

Cuando comáis esta noche recoged los platos.When you eat tonight, put the dishes away.

From my understanding, the word "recojed" is not subjunctive. It is the vosotros command form used in Spain for plural family and friends (you plural -vosotros form).  The subjunctive would be recojáis (which is both subjunctive and imperative). It appears that "recojed" is only in the  command from, a different tree in grammar.  

I noticed  that others have questioned the use of the imperative.  You hold stedfast that what you are using is the subjunctive, but as learners, we find that there are some differences.  For me, the use of "recojed" would be the imperative.

I have made this distinction in other exercises that use commands as subjunctive.  Maybe I am still missing something, but every verb book/site I reference for the verb trees, makes this distinction.  

In the case of the example above, I don't believe it would change the meaning, However, in some cases when the command has been switched for the subjunctive, the meaning feels different to me.  

Thank you for your consideration!

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