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Depends on subject, or object?

ClaudiaC1Kwiziq community member

Depends on subject, or object?

this is a helpful lesson with good examples.

but I’m confused.  the lesson says:  The verb is conjugated in the 3rd person singular or plural, according to the subject in the sentence.

aren’t the singular or plural things the objects of the sentences?

Asked 1 year ago
DavidC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

 

Hi there Claudia -

 

Yes, in the translation-option using "You can ..." or "You must ...", the nouns are indeed grammatical 'objects' [accusatives].

However, to understand and remember this type of construction, in this exercise it is important to focus on [and try to translate] the Spanish version, i.e. -

 

Very nice jewels may be bought ...

Wine must not be consumed ...

The Prado Museum may be visited ...

Taxes must be paid ...

 

- and in sentences like these^ four above, the noun is normally regarded as a grammatical subject [of a passive construction].

 

With regards,

David Mc

 

InmaKwiziq team member

Hola Claudia

Just to add to David's very correct explanation, I can say that the subject in the passive se sentence (this is normally called el sujeto paciente) is what would have been the direct object if we turn it into an "active sentence". For example:

Active:

Mucha gente puede visitar el museo.  (el museo is the direct object of this active sentence)

Lots of people can visit the museum.

Passive:

El museo se puede visitar (por mucha gente). (el museo, sujeto paciente on this passive sentence)

The museum can be visited (by lots of people).

I'm omitting the "people" part in the passive sentence because in a passive se sentence the person/people doing the action is/are not relevant.

Saludos

Inma

DavidC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

We can confirm that [in English] the noun is definitely a subject in the passive sentences which I quoted - by choosing an example with a pronoun, [despite the fact that it does not contain the extra "must be ..." portion], e.g. -

"He is regarded as a rebel" ... [Not: "Him is ...]

It should be possible to construct a similar illustration in Spanish -

e.g. ? - "Yo estoy considerado como un rebelde".

Depends on subject, or object?

this is a helpful lesson with good examples.

but I’m confused.  the lesson says:  The verb is conjugated in the 3rd person singular or plural, according to the subject in the sentence.

aren’t the singular or plural things the objects of the sentences?

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