Aburrirse - Cansarse

JohnB2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Aburrirse - Cansarse

Hola Inma, Two questions: 1. I used "mientras estamos ocupados" for "while we are busy," and was marked incorrect. I may have misread it but the relevant lesson says that "mientras" is used with the present indicative to express "while," and that "mientras que (and mientras)," mean "as long as" in which case both would be followed by the subjunctive. In the Tip on the page it says that while is translated as mientras + El Presente. Is the english translation of 'while we are busy' incorrect in this exercise or is this an error - or is there some distinction I have missed? 2. Would cansarse be an acceptable alternative to aburrirse to describe "get bored." Saludos John
Asked 5 months ago
InmaKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hola John,

with reference to 1. that should say "mientras" because it is talking about a simultaneous action. For your information though, "mientras que" could actually take the indicative too, but only when it is making a "contrast", for example: "Carlos trabaja siempre muy duro, mientras que su hermana Laura es muy perezosa." (mientras que + indicative = contrast). I will revise that lesson and will check that this is reflected.

2. cansarse is not quite the same as aburrirse in their general meaning; I wouldn't say they are synonyms but I can see the association you are making; When you get tired of something this implies you get bored of something. In this exercise you can take it as that so it is fair to have cansarse as another possible translation. I will add it. 

Un saludo,

Inma

Aburrirse - Cansarse

Hola Inma, Two questions: 1. I used "mientras estamos ocupados" for "while we are busy," and was marked incorrect. I may have misread it but the relevant lesson says that "mientras" is used with the present indicative to express "while," and that "mientras que (and mientras)," mean "as long as" in which case both would be followed by the subjunctive. In the Tip on the page it says that while is translated as mientras + El Presente. Is the english translation of 'while we are busy' incorrect in this exercise or is this an error - or is there some distinction I have missed? 2. Would cansarse be an acceptable alternative to aburrirse to describe "get bored." Saludos John

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