Using hace to talk about the weather

In Spanish, we use hace to talk about the weather:

Hoy hace mucho sol.
Today it's very sunny.

Hace viento en la playa.
It is windy on the beach.

Hace mucho calor en el desierto.
It is very hot in the desert.

Hace 37 grados en el sur del país.
It is 37 degrees in the south of the country.

Note, hace sol literally means it makes sun so this is quite different to how we talk about weather in English where we use expressions like it is sunny or it's 30 degrees. 

Hace frío.
It is cold.

Hace 3 grados afuera.
It is 3 degrees outside.

This is the most common way of asking about the weather:

¿Qué tiempo hace hoy?
What is the weather like today?

Never use the verb ser to talk about the weather!

See also Using hay, está, or an impersonal verb to talk about the weather.

Learn more about these related Spanish grammar topics

Examples and resources

Hace 37 grados en el sur del país.
It is 37 degrees in the south of the country.


Hace frío.
It is cold.


Hace viento en la playa.
It is windy on the beach.


Hace un frío horrible esta semana.
It is terribly cold this week.


Hace mucho calor en el desierto.
It is very hot in the desert.


Hace 3 grados afuera.
It is 3 degrees outside.


Hoy hace mucho sol.
Today it's very sunny.


¿Qué tiempo hace hoy?
What is the weather like today?


Q&A

Regina

Kwiziq community member

4 February 2019

1 reply

Why "Hace frío," but "Hace _un_ frío horrible?"

Why is there an article in front of frío in the second instance?

Inma

Kwiziq language super star

4 February 2019

4/02/19

Hola Regina

In the second sentence "Hace un frío horrible" we are using the article because it is also a type of structure we use to describe the weather. However we say "Hace/hay + un/una .... +adjective" when we talk about something a bit "extreme", for example:

"Hay una tormenta muy grande en el norte" (There is a big storm in the north)

"Hace un calor terrible en Sevilla" (It is terribly hot in Seville)

The more simple structure with Hay/Hace + noun is less emphatic with less detail.

I hope this clarifies it.

Un saludo

Inma

Mags

Kwiziq community member

18 October 2017

3 replies

Hay or hace?

In the question It's very foggy, I used hay instead of hace (by mistake!) But I got the credit. I guess it could be ok to say there's a lot of fog, hay mucho niebla, but is it better to stick to hace?

Gruff

Kwiziq language super star

18 October 2017

18/10/17

Hi Mags - in many weather expression you can use both hay and hace. Note hay comes from haber (to have) and hace comes from hacer (to make/do), so there's a nuance a little like the different between being and doing here. We'll create more lessons to make this clearer so you can see how they all work, along with estar, since that's also a possibility!

Mags

Kwiziq community member

18 October 2017

18/10/17

¡Gracias!

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