Dejar in imperative + que + subjunctive

GraemeB2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Dejar in imperative + que + subjunctive

An example given in the lesson Dejar vs Dejarse suggests the following:

Dejad que os explique mis planes = Let me explain my plans to you

Firstly, I guess subjunctive is being used here because it adds an extra level of politeness to this request? 

However, if I was asked to translate this from English to Spanish I would probably use the indicative: Déjame explicarte mis planes.

So, is my translation wrong? Or is it, let's say, simply less refined? If so, would my translation be quite acceptable if I was talking to a close friend for instance? 

Saludos

This question relates to:Spanish lesson "Dejar vs Dejarse "
Asked 4 months ago
DavidC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Graeme - My Grammar book [by Butt and Benjamin] lists exceptions to the normal rule (which is: Verbs of influence, i.e., commands, recommendations, suggestions, requests, advice, prohibition etc., require the subjunctive whenever there is a change of subject - which is of course the case with your example "Dejad que os explique mis planes")...

… and this book actually says that dejar is usually an exception; i.e. the infinitive construction tends to be used more with this verb (and with certain others) even when the subject is different from the one which is carried by the other verb. Some verbs are in a "transitional state", apparently, such that the infinitive option is slowly creeping in.

The book does not say anything in this particular context about politeness or formal usage.

Dejar in imperative + que + subjunctive

An example given in the lesson Dejar vs Dejarse suggests the following:

Dejad que os explique mis planes = Let me explain my plans to you

Firstly, I guess subjunctive is being used here because it adds an extra level of politeness to this request? 

However, if I was asked to translate this from English to Spanish I would probably use the indicative: Déjame explicarte mis planes.

So, is my translation wrong? Or is it, let's say, simply less refined? If so, would my translation be quite acceptable if I was talking to a close friend for instance? 

Saludos

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